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Death-in-the-Garden

The New York Times reviews Elizabeth Ironside’s novels

The New York Times reviewed three of the five Elizabeth Ironside novels published by Felony & Mayhem Press. This is what they had to say about A Good Death:

“A GOOD DEATH which is set in the French countryside after the collapse of the Vichy government, gives short shrift to all those romantic legends about the French Resistance. In the haunted eyes of Theo de Cazalle, an aide to General de Gaulle, foreign troops were not the only ones who destroyed his country…’Village war is not less significant than world war,’ he comes to realize over the course of this bleak and beautiful novel.”

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…Death in the Garden:

“An extremely stylish piece of writing DEATH IN THE GARDEN is a country-house mystery told in two parts, opening in 1925 on a gracious estate with a lively group of friends gathered for a birthday party that turns grim when the host is poisoned and his wife is arrested for the murder. The leisurely pace of the storytelling is perfectly pitched to that mannerly period between the two world wars when attractive people like George Pollexfen, an influential member of Parliament, and his charming wife, Diana, a “New Woman” with a vivid bohemian sensibility, could spend a weekend entertaining their clever friends from the city.”

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…And The Accomplice:

Like “Death in the Garden,” the novel that introduced American readers to Elizabeth Ironside’s delicate but lethal storytelling style, THE ACCOMPLICE assembles its cast at a social gathering at an elegant English country house. The setting is gracious, the guests have lovely manners and the talk is civilized – until workmen digging up the rose garden at Ashe House uncover the skeleton of a child…Ironside exercises such subtle restraint on the story – told from multiple perspectives in alternating chapters covering a half-century of events – that its complexity can’t be fully appreciated until the very end.”

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